SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER AND MOTOR SKILLS

Our monthly training, in partnership with Pure Souls Learning Foundation, was held on 23rd September, 2017 on the topic Sensory Processing Disorder and Motor Skills..  The training is aimed at educating the parents and caregivers on how to manage children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and other related developmental disorders.

The training started with the introduction of Mr. Akinelure Abimbola, the facilitator, by Mrs. Aanu Senbanjo.

The topic was divided into three sub-headings:

FINE MOTOR SKILLS

The facilitator explained the effective use of hands in engagement of activities.  He said that among the fingers, the thumb performs the most important functions in the areas in the areas of writing, holding small items, eating, cutting papers, using computer keys etc.  He explained the fine motor of a child in the normal developmental age and that of a child whose developmental skills are not age-appropriate.  He advised the parents to have lego rooms for their children, as hand manipulation is very important for the fingers.

-PHYSICAL AND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT (GROSS MOTOR SKILLS)

He explained that movement is very important for children, and that playing is a very important activity for the children.  He further explained that gross motor focuses in developing fine motor skills and that one of the important principles of motor development is the readiness of the child; hence parents should not force any child to do activities against their wish.  He further advised parents to be directional in anything they do with the children.

SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER

He explained this as a condition in which the brain has trouble receiving and responding to information that comes in through the sense.  He said that some children with sensory processing disorder are oversensitive to things in their environment; hence heavy work is important because it helps them to burn out energy.

In the question and answer session, a parent asked what common assessment he could carry out at home. He answered that the common assessment at home is to always observe the children at home.  Another parent asked what he should do when a child of 5 years is doing what a child of 2 years should be doing.  He answered and said he should understand that that child has a challenge, and that parents should not compare their children’s abilities with other children.

In conclusion, Mrs. Akande advised the parents on how to deal with children.  She said that many of the children are highly intelligent, and that they should tap into their abilities.

The program ended at 1.30 pm.  19 parents were in attendance.

Light refreshment was served, and it was followed by a group photograph of the participants.